businesses

Blame Climate Change for Record Water Levels in the Great Lakes: Prof

Blame Climate Change for Record Water Levels in the Great Lakes: Prof

Climate change is a deciding factor in record high water levels in the Great Lakes being higher than ever before, a University of Waterloo professor told CTV’s Your Morning on Wednesday. According to government statistics, July water levels for the bodies of water between Canada and the U.S. were at record highs. And this can lead to faster erosion of the coastline and flooding. The flooding this spring and summer along the northern shores of Lake Ontario, the Toronto Islands and some Toronto-area beaches has been particularly troublesome for homeowners and businesses.

St. Lawrence water levels could wash away more than $1B

St. Lawrence water levels could wash away more than $1B

Rising water levels in the St. Lawrence Seaway could cost the economy more than $1 billion, shippers and port operators say. A new study from the Chamber of Marine Commerce warns that opening the floodgates further at a dam in Cornwall, Ont., would wash away between $1 billion and $1.75 billion in revenue for businesses on both sides of the border. A board of control recently increased the flow at the Moses Saunders Dam — the only control point on the St. Lawrence Seaway, which includes the Great Lakes — to allow 10,400 cubic metres of water per second out of Lake Ontario.

P.E.I. businesses, public buildings encouraged to provide free tap water

P.E.I. businesses, public buildings encouraged to provide free tap water

The creator of the Blue W program is encouraging more P.E.I. businesses and public buildings to offer free tap water, in part to reduce the use of plastic water bottles. The Blue W program uses an interactive map to indicate locations where people can fill their reusable bottle without feeling compelled to make additional purchases. 

Iqaluit residents speak out on trucked water, sewage services

Iqaluit residents speak out on trucked water, sewage services

The public gallery at Iqaluit city hall was packed for Thursday night's public consultation on a bylaw that governs the city's water supply and sewer service. However, with increasing water restrictions due to low levels in the city's water supply from Lake Geraldine, people came out en masse to talk about water usage in general.