wastewater

Water taxes could jump by $100, warns St. John's mayor — who wants time to fix infrastructure

Water taxes could jump by $100, warns St. John's mayor — who wants time to fix infrastructure

St. John's Mayor Danny Breen says the city is facing a wastewater problem that will cost tens of millions of dollars to fix — and he wants more time from the federal government to do it. Changes to federal government regulations in 2014 required cities to test the levels of suspended solids and chemical biological oxygen demand — essentially, the amount of oxygen needed for organic material to be broken down in water. The levels found in St. John's mean the city has to build a secondary treatment facility by the end of 2020, which Breen said will cost the city about $85 million to build.

Federal government announces $7.2M for safe drinking water in Wauzhushk Onigum

Federal government announces $7.2M for safe drinking water in Wauzhushk Onigum

The federal government has announced $7.2M in funding to connect Wauzhushk Onigum to the City of Kenora's water system. The announcement was long-awaited, with part of the community just south of Kenora, Ont., on a boil-water advisory since 2012. Another portion of Wauzhushk Onigum had its water treatment facility rebuilt in 2017. MP Bob Nault made the announcement on behalf of Jane Philpott, the Minister of Indigenous Services.

Watershed moment for towns

Watershed moment for towns

Several local towns will be swimming in powerful funding money in the near future, providing vital repair services for their water treatment and expansion projects. Springside, Saltcoats, and Churchbridge are recipients of the Small Communities Fund, which provides financial aid for waterworks across Saskatchewan. The three communities were among 46 infrastructure projects chosen for funding in the province.

'It's pretty embarrassing': Winnipeg aims to put less poop in river

'It's pretty embarrassing': Winnipeg aims to put less poop in river

Some 3.2 million litres of raw sewage and rainfall runoff spilled into Winnipeg's river system last month but the incident was unusual only in scope. The amount -- more than an Olympic-sized swimming pool -- was one of the largest spills in years, but was one of about 20 such events that occur each year.

Majority of Canadian cities don’t monitor real-time data of sewage leaks into lakes, rivers

Majority of Canadian cities don’t monitor real-time data of sewage leaks into lakes, rivers

There, in plain sight and floating around the docks and pedestrian bridges along the waterfront of Canada’s biggest city, was a toxic stew of used condoms, plastic tampon applicators and mounds of shredded toilet paper, along with a countless quantity of other, unidentifiable solids.

Untreated sewage pollutes water across the country

Untreated sewage pollutes water across the country

Nearly 120 million cubic metres of untreated sewage and runoff entered Canadian waterways in 2016, StarMetro has learned.
That’s roughly the same amount of water that roars over the edge of Niagara Falls over the course of 12 hours — except it’s not whitewater spewing from these pipes. It’s murky, brown and a little bit chunky.