Welcome To Bancroft, Ont. Where Residents Are Charged $2,400 Water Bills

Welcome To Bancroft, Ont. Where Residents Are Charged $2,400 Water Bills

In 2016, town council approved an average increase of 53 per cent to the water and sewer rates. About 900 addresses within town limits — homes that are required to be connected to the municipal water system — were hit by the rate surge. The increase was an unpopular move. In Bancroft, incomes average $33,460, which is about 30 per cent lower than the provincial average of $47,915.

Edmonton water bills could increase

Edmonton water bills could increase

EPCOR needs money to lower the lead levels in Edmonton’s drinking water – a cost that may wind up on residents water bills. Although officials from EPCOR and the city said the drinking water is safe, levels must be reduced to meet new federal regulations. Earlier this month Health Canada cut acceptable lead levels in half, from 10 micrograms per litre to five.

Indigenous guardians sound alarm about climate change impacts in Canada

Indigenous guardians sound alarm about climate change impacts in Canada

More than 40 Indigenous communities in Canada have launched guardian programs, which employ local members to monitor ecosystems and protect sensitive areas and species. At a national gathering in Vancouver this week, guardians raised alarm about environmental degradation and climate change in their territories.

Researcher looks at keeping our drinking water safe: CFI John R. Evans Leaders Fund supports Susana Kimura-Hara’s lab infrastructure

Researcher looks at keeping our drinking water safe: CFI John R. Evans Leaders Fund supports Susana Kimura-Hara’s lab infrastructure

Access to safe drinking water is essential to human life. Researchers have the capacity to significantly advance science to help deliver safe drinking water under a constantly changing environment such as floods and wastewater spills to rivers and lakes.

Yellowknife's aging drinking water pipe to be replaced in $30M project

Yellowknife's aging drinking water pipe to be replaced in $30M project

A decades-old pipe that carries Yellowknife's drinking water is going to be replaced in a project funded by the federal and municipal governments. Wednesday's announcement comes more than a year after a consultant's report laid out two options: use a less expensive pipe connecting to a closer water supply or replace the current pipe for nearly $15 million more.

Open-pit mine near Abitibi's pristine water source gets environmental review, but residents remain wary

Open-pit mine near Abitibi's pristine water source gets environmental review, but residents remain wary

A proposed open-pit mine near a pristine water source in northern Quebec will get a full public review, Quebec's environment minister announced last week. But around 200 people still protested this weekend in Amos, 600 kilometres north of Montreal, saying they intend to make sure the provincial government keeps its promise.

Semiahmoo First Nation takes first step toward new water system

Semiahmoo First Nation takes first step toward new water system

The construction of a modest road into a small community wouldn't usually get a full ground-breaking photo op, complete with gold-coloured shovels and government officials. But for the Semiahmoo First Nation, the road work is just the first step toward new water infrastructure that will end the community's 15-year permanent boil water advisory. "I'm waiting for a day to be able to turn on a tap and drink a glass of water," said Harley Chappell, Semiahmoo's elected chief. "That's the goal."

Water taxes could jump by $100, warns St. John's mayor — who wants time to fix infrastructure

Water taxes could jump by $100, warns St. John's mayor — who wants time to fix infrastructure

St. John's Mayor Danny Breen says the city is facing a wastewater problem that will cost tens of millions of dollars to fix — and he wants more time from the federal government to do it. Changes to federal government regulations in 2014 required cities to test the levels of suspended solids and chemical biological oxygen demand — essentially, the amount of oxygen needed for organic material to be broken down in water. The levels found in St. John's mean the city has to build a secondary treatment facility by the end of 2020, which Breen said will cost the city about $85 million to build.

Rules for high-capacity wells not included in new Water Act consultations

Rules for high-capacity wells not included in new Water Act consultations

The P.E.I. government released two different sets of regulations for the province's Water Act for public consultation Tuesday, but opposition parties wanted to draw attention to regulations which were not released to the public.

Iqaluit says it needs to keep pumping water from Apex River

Iqaluit says it needs to keep pumping water from Apex River

The City of Iqaluit says it needs to keep pumping water from the Apex River to maintain the city's water supply. "Right now we sort of live in a bit of uncertainty about our water source," said Romeyn Stevenson, deputy mayor of Iqaluit. Lake Geraldine supplies the city with fresh drinking water; snow and rain refills the lake. Last summer was the first time the city refilled Lake Geraldine with water pumped from the Apex River.

Ontario's Green party leader to table first bill ever and it's on water protection

Ontario's Green party leader to table first bill ever and it's on water protection

Green Party of Ontario Leader Mike Schreiner will table his first ever private member's bill Wednesday. In it, he asks the province to protect a drinking water source for Guelph, Wellington county and Waterloo region. It's the first bill introduced by the party in the provincial legislature. "For decades the people of Guelph have shown the province how to responsibly use water and what it means to defend water against private interests. Now, climate change and sprawl are putting even more strain on our water supply, so we must take action to protect what's left," Schreiner said in a release prior to tabling the bill Wednesday.

UBC researchers develop inexpensive tool to test drinking water

UBC researchers develop inexpensive tool to test drinking water

A handheld ‘tricorder’ that can test for biological contamination in real-time has been the dream of science fiction fans for decades. And UBC Okanagan engineers say the technology is closer to science fact than ever before. Using a small and inexpensive biosensor, researchers in the School of Engineering have developed a novel low-cost technique that quickly and accurately detects cryptosporidium contamination in water samples.

P.E.I. businesses, public buildings encouraged to provide free tap water

P.E.I. businesses, public buildings encouraged to provide free tap water

The creator of the Blue W program is encouraging more P.E.I. businesses and public buildings to offer free tap water, in part to reduce the use of plastic water bottles. The Blue W program uses an interactive map to indicate locations where people can fill their reusable bottle without feeling compelled to make additional purchases. 

Frustration grows in Neskantaga First Nation as dream of clean drinking water turns muddy

Frustration grows in Neskantaga First Nation as dream of clean drinking water turns muddy

Moonias said Indigenous Services needs to work with them to get a new contractor who will complete the project. He’s calling for a shutdown of the reverse osmosis system – and a return to bottled water to all homes instead.

West Saint John leaks caused by water source changeover, says report

West Saint John leaks caused by water source changeover, says report

A new $40 thousand report concludes scaly material that built up over decades in the water pipes of west Saint John homes was weakened by a change in the water source, which eventually caused leaks. The report follows over 200 complaints of leaking pipes and a series of angry public meetings that concluded in an ongoing class action lawsuit.

Northern Pulp's plans for pipeline, effluent treatment plant now public

Northern Pulp's plans for pipeline, effluent treatment plant now public

Nova Scotians now have access to the details of Northern Pulp's controversial plan to build a new effluent treatment plant and discharge pipeline that will empty into the Northumberland Strait. The plan put forward to the Environment Department is to build a "biological activated sludge" treatment facility purchased from a Paris-based multinational corporation called Veolia Water Technologies.

Provincewide well water testing now available through health authority

Provincewide well water testing now available through health authority

The cost of testing ranges between $30 and $120, depending on the scope of the analysis. The provincial Environment Department recommends residents on well water have it tested for bacteria every six months, and every two years for chemicals such as arsenic, fluoride, lead, nitrate/nitrite and uranium. Bacterial quality is usually assessed by a coliform test.