Raw sewage overflowing into Ontario waterways at alarming rate, watchdog says

Raw sewage overflowing into Ontario waterways at alarming rate, watchdog says

Raw sewage has been overflowing into Ontario's lakes and rivers at an alarming rate and the government is doing little to stop it, the province's environmental watchdog said Tuesday as she laid out broad changes required to help keep waterways clean. Environmental Commissioner Dianne Saxe outlined her concerns and recommendations in an annual report — called Back to Basics — that looked at the state of the province's waterways between April 2017 and March this year. During that time, the report found that raw sewage overflowed into southern Ontario waterways 1,327 times. More than half of those overflows — 766 — were from nearly 60 outdated municipal sewer systems that combine sewage and stormwater.

Federal government announces $7.2M for safe drinking water in Wauzhushk Onigum

Federal government announces $7.2M for safe drinking water in Wauzhushk Onigum

The federal government has announced $7.2M in funding to connect Wauzhushk Onigum to the City of Kenora's water system. The announcement was long-awaited, with part of the community just south of Kenora, Ont., on a boil-water advisory since 2012. Another portion of Wauzhushk Onigum had its water treatment facility rebuilt in 2017. MP Bob Nault made the announcement on behalf of Jane Philpott, the Minister of Indigenous Services.

Moncton could spend $27M on 'worst case' algae fix

Moncton could spend $27M on 'worst case' algae fix

Moncton's $77.6-million capital budget sets aside millions to deal with blue-green algae in the municipal water supply. Jack MacDonald, Moncton's general manager of engineering and environmental services, said the city will work with Dalhousie University to study whether a water purification system could be added at the treatment plant to handle the algae.

Remembering safe drinking water pioneer Hans Peterson

Remembering safe drinking water pioneer Hans Peterson

He was a safe drinking water pioneer. Hans Peterson was one of the founders of the Safe Drinking Water Foundation He dedicated his life to helping rural communities with their water treatment issues. Peterson died of a heart attack last week at the age of 68. This morning..we look back on his career and the invention that changed the lives on a number of Saskatchewan First Nations.

Dr. Hans Peterson remembered for bringing safe drinking water to thousands

Dr. Hans Peterson remembered for bringing safe drinking water to thousands

A pioneer in safe drinking water is being remembered for changing thousands of lives. Dr. Hans Peterson died of a heart attack last week at the age of 68. Peterson helped found the Safe Drinking Water Foundation (SDWF) and pioneered the development of the Integrated Biological and Reverse Osmosis Membrane (IBROM) water treatment process.

Get the lead out: City homes will be affected by new Health Canada regulations on lead in water

Get the lead out: City homes will be affected by new Health Canada regulations on lead in water

Looming changes to Health Canada’s acceptable concentration levels of lead in drinking water could see a wash of city homes creep above the recommended level, Epcor warned city council’s utility committee Thursday. Presently, it’s considered safe to have up to 10 micrograms per litre in drinking water. But Epcor officials said Thursday that the federal health agency is signalling it will lower that level to five micrograms per litre, a change that will affect more than 30,000 Edmonton homes.

Is alkaline water a miracle cure – or BS? The science is in

Is alkaline water a miracle cure – or BS? The science is in

Alkaline water, which is water that has been treated to have a higher pH level than the 6.5-7.5 pH range of most tap and bottled water, is experiencing a surge of popularity. Beyoncé helped kickstart the trend in 2013 when reports surfaced that she included alkaline water on a rider for her Mrs Carter Show world tour. Tom Brady is another celebrity who has professed his love for the stuff. According to data from the Beverage Marketing Corporation, a research and consultancy group, the alkaline water market has grown from being a $47m business in 2014 to a $427m business in 2017. It’s projected to be worth $687m by the end of 2018.

Neighbours claim Saint John's new water treatment plant ruined their wells

Neighbours claim Saint John's new water treatment plant ruined their wells

For well over a year, Rob and Connie Crow have struggled to keep their failing water well from quitting altogether. First the water softener stopped working. They discovered the water coming from the well carried a gritty substance that left an oily film on their hands. Rob shrugs when asked what it is. "I can guarantee you it's not good for you," he said.

Dry lakes and dust storms: Dramatic changes to Yukon glaciers are warning for planet, researchers say

Dry lakes and dust storms: Dramatic changes to Yukon glaciers are warning for planet, researchers say

Gwenn Flowers, a glaciologist, trudges back and forth across a vast glacier in southwest Yukon, pulling a radar device mounted on skis behind her. "We as Canadians are stewards of about a third of the world's mountain glaciers and ice caps, so this is our responsibility," Flowers says. The dramatic changes to the glaciers in the Yukon are an early warning of what climate change could mean for the rest of the planet, researchers say. And Flowers sees lots of reason for concern reflected in the state of the ice.

Soot-filled rivers a concern following wildfires

Soot-filled rivers a concern following wildfires

During the record-breaking 2018 fire season, the typically clear waters of Cameron Falls in Waterton Lakes National Park in southern Alberta flowed black. But it had nothing to do with the extensive fires that torched much of British Columbia and a small part of Waterton.

Study finds evidence of microplastics in human gut, but health impacts unclear

Study finds evidence of microplastics in human gut, but health impacts unclear

In the first study of its kind, researchers say they have found evidence of tiny plastic particles in the human gut. Austrian researchers analyzed stool samples of eight people from different countries and found that all of them tested positive for at least one microplastic. On average, there were 20 microplastic particles found per 10 grams of stool.

'It just looks horrible': Black Tickle man wants cleaner, clearer water

'It just looks horrible': Black Tickle man wants cleaner, clearer water

It stains laundry, corrodes pipes and looks terrible. The water that people in Black Tickle use for bathing and doing laundry is treated with chlorine but it remains dark and muddy because of high iron content. "It's almost like either coffee or Coke," resident Sheldon Morris said, "and it stains everything, and that's the worst."

Two-thirds of Kelowna candidates support water system integration

Two-thirds of Kelowna candidates support water system integration

The vast majority of Kelowna City Council candidates support the further integration of water suppliers. The city recently amalgamated with the South East Kelowna Irrigation District but still only provides water to 50 per cent of residents. Irrigation districts in Glenmore-Ellison, Black Mountain and Rutland serve most of the rest of Kelowna (there are 26 small systems supplying about 1,300 residents). The city wants to bring all water under its umbrella and integrate all the systems.

Calgary city councillors reject low-income assistance for water bills

Calgary city councillors reject low-income assistance for water bills

City administrators have developed a pilot project to help the poorest Calgarians with their water bills. But a city council committee has plenty of questions and defeated the proposal, at least for now. According to the city, 2,300 people who are more than 90 days in arrears on their bills currently owe the city nearly $1 million.

Meters that track water usage online in real time coming to Cambridge

Meters that track water usage online in real time coming to Cambridge

The City of Cambridge is installing new technology in 1,200 homes in west Preson and west Galt to better monitor water usage. Water meters will be retrofitted so city staff can read meter data remotely, and people can track their daily water usage online. City officials say that will also help them quickly identify possible leaks or flow issues.

Watershed moment for towns

Watershed moment for towns

Several local towns will be swimming in powerful funding money in the near future, providing vital repair services for their water treatment and expansion projects. Springside, Saltcoats, and Churchbridge are recipients of the Small Communities Fund, which provides financial aid for waterworks across Saskatchewan. The three communities were among 46 infrastructure projects chosen for funding in the province.