Shoal Lake JV to build new water, wastewater system

Shoal Lake JV to build new water, wastewater system

SHOAL LAKE, ONT. — A joint venture (JV) involving Shoal Lake 40 Contractors LP and Sigfusson Northern Ltd. has been named the winning bidder in a competition to earn the right to construct a new water and wastewater system for Shoal Lake First Nation in northwestern Ontario. Indigenous Services Canada is contributing $33 million for the project, which includes construction of a water treatment plant, reservoir, raw water intake structure and lift station as well as the installation of watermain connections and fire hydrants, stated a Sept. 6 release.

'The Blob' is back: Scientists track blanket of warm water off West Coast

'The Blob' is back: Scientists track blanket of warm water off West Coast

A large swath of warm water spanning thousands of kilometres from the Bering Sea to Mexico, nicknamed by scientists as “the Blob,” has returned to the West Coast, threatening marine life and fisheries. The Blob was christened in 2014, after a similar natural event that spanned two years devastated the salmon industry, damaged ecosystems and disrupted wildlife like whales, sea lions and crabs. “This is a massive pool… of warm water that’s in the Pacific, that is thousands of kilometres huge,” said senior climatologist for Environment Canada David Phillips on CTV’s Your Morning Tuesday. “This one stretches from the Bering Strait, the Bering Sea, right through the Gulf of Alaska, right through to California, British Columbia, and down to Mexico.”

Tenants sue former landlords for allegedly putting irrigation water into their drinking source

Tenants sue former landlords for allegedly putting irrigation water into their drinking source

When Steven and Diane Hayes look back at the eight years they spent questioning the quality of their drinking water, battling bouts of diarrhea and other stomach troubles, they tell CBC News they still have a hard time believing the people they called friends and whom they trusted — their landlords — were responsible. It's an accusation the Hayes are now trying to prove in a civil lawsuit.

Baffled over the purpose of new water and watershed bylaw

Baffled over the purpose of new water and watershed bylaw

On Oct. 20, 2018 the citizens of the Cowichan Valley voted for establishing the Drinking Water and Watershed Protection Service Establishment Bylaw (#4202). We thought that this bylaw would be used to protect our water supplies. It has been known for many years that the wells at three commercial establishments on Fisher Road, Cobble Hill had nitrate levels greatly exceeding the Health Canada Drinking Water Guidelines. These wells and surrounding CVRD monitoring wells have been monitored by a number of agencies, including the CVRD, in the past. The Cobble Hill Aquifer Interagency Task Group (CHAITG) was established to deal with this nitrate contamination and this Task Group commissioned Western Water Associates Ltd. (WWAL) to carry out a review of past studies. Surprisingly, this review did not review aquifer nitrite levels, only nitrate levels. Nitrite is a bigger concern than nitrate since nitrite can convert the oxygen-carrying hemoglobin to methemoglobin which does not carry oxygen. Thus, nitrite can cause tissue oxygen deficiency which is particularly problematical for infants and children since it can stunt their mental and physical growth.

Moncton lays groundwork to deal with cyanobacteria in water supply

Moncton lays groundwork to deal with cyanobacteria in water supply

Moncton plans to spend $6 million this winter to upgrade its water treatment plant, the first phase of a plan to deal with cyanobacteria in the municipal water supply. Cyanobacteria was found in 2017 in the Turtle Creek watershed, the drinking water source for Moncton, Dieppe and Riverview. Cyanobacteria, also known as blue-green algae, can form blooms and produce toxins harmful to humans and animals. The water remains safe to drink and the multimillion dollar upgrades are meant to keep it that way. 

Cities urge federal leaders to wade into wastewater debate

Cities urge federal leaders to wade into wastewater debate

In Canada's largest city, raw sewage flows into Lake Ontario so often, Toronto tells people they should never swim off the city's beaches for least two days after it rains. Across the country in Mission, B.C., a three-decade-old pipe that carries sewage under the Fraser River to a treatment plant in Abbotsford is so loaded operators can't even slip a camera inside it to look for damage. If that pipe bursts, it will dump 11 million litres of putrid water from area homes and businesses into a critical salmon habitat every day it isn't fixed.

A second chance: Canada, U.S. renegotiate a critical water treaty

A second chance: Canada, U.S. renegotiate a critical water treaty

The Columbia River Treaty, an international agreement governing the flow of water between British Columbia and six U.S. states, will be 55 years old this year. It has not aged well. The river springs from the Columbia Icefield in the Rocky Mountains of B.C. and winds 1,930 kilometres through the Northwestern United States – Washington, Oregon, Idaho, Montana, Nevada and Wyoming. No other river in North America spills more water into the Pacific Ocean.

WSP Canada Wins Award for Innovative Solution for Safe Water in Remote Communities

WSP Canada Wins Award for Innovative Solution for Safe Water in Remote Communities

WSP won for its work in developing an innovative solution for safe water in remote communities. Like many remote communities, the people of the Tl’azt’en Nation in northern B.C. had no access to clean drinking water. Because conventional water treatment technology was unfeasible, WSP Canada and the RES’EAU-WaterNET partnered to develop a treatment system for organic material. The project delivered a full-scale plant that allowed a 14-year boil water advisory to be lifted. The system uses natural biological processes, is low in consumables, reduces chemical requirements, produces little waste and is simple for operators to use.

Cross-border dam generates no power, but its uncertain fate fuels anxiety

Cross-border dam generates no power, but its uncertain fate fuels anxiety

The tiny Forest City dam on the border between Maine and New Brunswick doesn't look like much more than a pile of rusting iron and aged lumber. Plants and weeds grow throughout the rock-and-crib-style dam, which is home to a family of weasels, a rudimentary passage for fish and is used in summer by local kids to float inner tubes through its gates. The dam itself doesn't generate electricity. It was built to help loggers float their timber to local mills. But its three gates have maintained the waters of East Grand Lake on New Brunswick's western border at consistent levels for almost 180 years.

Higher levels of opioids and meth found in Vancouver waste water: StatsCan

 Higher levels of opioids and meth found in Vancouver waste water: StatsCan

Metro Vancouver has higher-than-average levels of opioids and methamphetamine in its waste-water system compared with other Canadian cities, according to a new Statistics Canada study analyzing cannabis and drug use in the country based on what Canadians flush down their toilets. In contrast, Vancouver reported less-than-average levels of cannabis in sewage, casting doubt on the city’s reputation as Canada’s cannabis capital.

Contigo Kids Cleanable Water Bottles Recalled In Canada Due To Choking Hazard

Contigo Kids Cleanable Water Bottles Recalled In Canada Due To Choking Hazard

Parents, check your cupboards, backpacks, cars, and everywhere else you keep water bottles. Health Canada recalled a popular brand of water bottles for kids on Tuesday due to a choking hazard. About 157,000 units of the affected Contigo Kids Cleanable Water Bottles, which are sold individually as well as in two- and three-packs, were sold in Canada. About 5.7 million were sold in the U.S.

Lake water to be pumped into Cowichan River as severe drought threatens town's water supply

Lake water to be pumped into Cowichan River as severe drought threatens town's water supply

The town of Lake Cowichan on Vancouver Island will start using pumps to keep the local river flowing, due to one of the most severe droughts its watershed has experienced. Water from Cowichan Lake will start being pumped into the Cowichan River on Thursday. Catalyst Crofton, the company that will manage the process, says 11 droughts have plagued the Cowichan basin since 1998.

Better drinking water and wastewater systems coming to multiple BC communities

Better drinking water and wastewater systems coming to multiple BC communities

WEST VANCOUVER, BC, Aug. 27, 2019 /CNW/ - The governments of Canadaand British Columbia are investing in modern reliable water services to build healthy sustainable communities where families can thrive today and for years to come. Today, Pamela Goldsmith-Jones, Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Foreign Affairs and Member of Parliament for West Vancouver–Sunshine Coast–Sea to Sky Country, on behalf of the Honourable François-Philippe Champagne, Minister of Infrastructure and Communities; and Sheila Malcolmson, Parliamentary Secretary for Environment and Member of the Legislative Assembly for Nanaimo, on behalf of the Honourable Selina Robinson, B.C. Minister of Municipal Affairs and Housing, announced funding for 15 projects to improve drinking water and wastewater services for residents across British Columbia.  

Sask. researcher says provincially-encouraged oil, gas extraction method could put groundwater at risk

Sask. researcher says provincially-encouraged oil, gas extraction method could put groundwater at risk

A University of Saskatchewan researcher says a form of oil extraction being encouraged by the Saskatchewan government needs more research and monitoring to avoid potential long-term contamination of drinking water in the province.
Grant Ferguson said his research suggests "waterflooding," a conventional form of oil extraction, could become a bigger problem for Saskatchewan than the more controversial practice known as fracking. 

Tests show Deer Lake drinking water clean, despite concern over barrels found in supply

Tests show Deer Lake drinking water clean, despite concern over barrels found in supply

Testing has found Deer Lake's drinking water is safe, after barrels were found in the canal that supplies the town's water. 
"It showed that the drinking water was safe during the whole period and [there was] no detrimental effect to the drinking water," said Darren Pelley, general manager of Kruger-owned Corner Brook Pulp and Paper.
"We're pleased that that's the conclusion, the report was fairly extensive."

Plastic particles in drinking water present 'low' risk - WHO

Plastic particles in drinking water present 'low' risk - WHO

Microplastics contained in drinking water pose a “low” risk to human health at current levels, but more research is needed to reassure consumers, the World Health Organization (WHO) said on Thursday.
Studies over the past year on plastic particles detected in tap and bottled water have sparked public concerns but the limited data appears reassuring, the U.N. agency said its first report on potential health risks associated with ingestion.

Water use restricted for critically low Koksilah River on Vancouver Island

Water use restricted for critically low Koksilah River on Vancouver Island

The British Columbia government is restricting water use around a river on southeastern Vancouver Island that is so low its fish populations — including steelhead, coho salmon and trout — may be threatened.
The Forests and Lands Ministry says the current flow of the Koksilah River south of Duncan has dropped below 180 litres per second, meaning habitat conditions are "severely degraded."

West-coast water foragers turn off their taps—and go straight to the source

West-coast water foragers turn off their taps—and go straight to the source

Once a month, Susan Chipman drives to a mountainside spring that burbles from the ground in North Vancouver and fills four 20-litre containers with water to use for drinking and cooking. When full, each container weighs 20 kg. Chipman lives on the top floor of a three-storey walk-up apartment in Vancouver. Her building has running water, of course, supplied and sourced by Metro Vancouver from protected reservoirs even higher up in the North Shore Mountains. But it lacks an elevator. So, she hauls her water jugs up the stairs, one in each hand for balance. “It’s a bit of a chore in the true sense of the word, but it’s worth it, I think.” Chipman says she was hooked from the first sip. She tasted it and thought, “OK, this is real water.”

Blame Climate Change for Record Water Levels in the Great Lakes: Prof

Blame Climate Change for Record Water Levels in the Great Lakes: Prof

Climate change is a deciding factor in record high water levels in the Great Lakes being higher than ever before, a University of Waterloo professor told CTV’s Your Morning on Wednesday. According to government statistics, July water levels for the bodies of water between Canada and the U.S. were at record highs. And this can lead to faster erosion of the coastline and flooding. The flooding this spring and summer along the northern shores of Lake Ontario, the Toronto Islands and some Toronto-area beaches has been particularly troublesome for homeowners and businesses.

City of Iqaluit declares 2nd water emergency in 2 years

City of Iqaluit declares 2nd water emergency in 2 years

The city of Iqaluit has declared a water emergency, for the second time in two years. Lake Geraldine— the reservoir for the city's potable water— is at a "historic low." There is less water in Lake Geraldine now than there was when the city declared a water emergency in 2018.