Living in a flood zone? Don't use well water, health officials warn

Living in a flood zone? Don't use well water, health officials warn

Even as floodwaters across the region stabilize, health officials are warning people living in flood zones — particularly those who get water from wells — to remain vigilant. Hundreds of homes have been damaged by the devastating floods that have washed through eastern Ontario and western Quebec, forcing residents and volunteers to spend days filling and loading up sandbags to protect their communities. 

Red Cross flying water into Shamattawa after treatment plant failure

Red Cross flying water into Shamattawa after treatment plant failure

Bottled water is being flown in to supply the remote northern community of Shamattawa First Nation after a failure at the water treatment plant. The Red Cross is flying 14,000 litres of bottled water to the community from Thompson. Shamattawa is about 745 kilometres northeast of Winnipeg and 361 kilometres northeast of Thompson.

Yellowknives Dene do not want to be overlooked as Giant Mine cleanup ramps up

Yellowknives Dene do not want to be overlooked as Giant Mine cleanup ramps up

Northerners looking to participate in the economic spin offs of the $1-billion Giant Mine remediation project can expect to wait for the water licence before the project's main manager gets specific on potential contracts. The project's deputy director, Natalie Plato, said that the main construction manager, Parsons Inc., gave the board the "most detailed schedule" it could within last six months.

Invasive zebra mussel larva found in lake that supplies Winnipeg drinking water

Invasive zebra mussel larva found in lake that supplies Winnipeg drinking water

A larval-stage zebra mussel has been found in water from Ontario's Shoal Lake, which is connected to Lake of the Woods and is the source of Winnipeg's drinking water. A single intact veliger, the microscopic larva of a zebra mussel, was found in one of six water samples taken from the lake, according to a news release issued jointly on Monday by the provinces of Manitoba and Ontario.

Ontario cottage country prepares for more 'tough days' as heavy rain aggravates floods

Ontario cottage country prepares for more 'tough days' as heavy rain aggravates floods

A large swath of Ontario is struggling to stay above water as heavy Friday rainfall exacerbates flood concerns in multiple regions. Heavy rain started in Toronto and much of southern Ontario in the morning and stretched through the afternoon. Some areas could see the rain change to flurries overnight. While Torontonians merely needed to pack an umbrella, residents about 150 kilometres north, in the towns of Bracebridge and Huntsville, are grappling with a more dangerous situation.

No charges to be laid against Vale after investigation of potentially toxic slag run-off

No charges to be laid against Vale after investigation of potentially toxic slag run-off

Environment Canada has decided not to lay charges against Vale for potentially dangerous run-off leaking from its Sudbury slag piles. But the mining company is currently installing a new system for controlling the slag seepage, work it says is unrelated to the government investigation. Environment Canada refused an interview with CBC, but said in a statement that it began investigating contaminated water coming from the Sudbury slag pile after a complaint from the public in 2012.

Activist honoured at first meeting of Great Lakes Guardians' Council

Activist honoured at first meeting of Great Lakes Guardians' Council

Ontario's government is working to protect what matters most by identifying priorities for action to help protect the water quality and ecosystems of the Great Lakes and other waterways as part of its commitment in the Made-in-Ontario Environment Plan. Today, Rod Phillips, Minister of the Environment, Conservation and Parks and Grand Council Chief Glen Hare co-chaired the Great Lakes Guardian Council, which includes leaders from across Ontario including municipalities, First Nations and Métis communities, environmental organizations, and the science community, to discuss challenges and opportunities around the Great Lakes.

Changes coming to Regina's lead pipe program after new Health Canada guidelines

Changes coming to Regina's lead pipe program after new Health Canada guidelines

Changes are coming to the way the City of Regina manages the lead pipes that carry drinking water after changes to the Health Canada guidelines. According to a report presented to Regina's public works committee, in the coming year the city plans to increase lead pipe replacements, improve construction best-practices and improve record-keeping for city and privately owned lead pipe connections. The city will also explore the feasibility and implications of corrosion control and continue to educate the public about lead pipes.

Okanagan water grants used to respond to climate change

Okanagan water grants used to respond to climate change

The Okanagan Basin Water Board has approved more than $318,000 in funding to 17 projects that will help conserve and protect water in the valley while addressing the larger issues of climate change. Directors approved the Water Conservation and Quality Improvement grants at their last board meeting, April 2. Recipients have now been notified. In total, there were 31 applications with a total ask of $688,281.

MP calls for national strategy to protect Canada's freshwater

MP calls for national strategy to protect Canada's freshwater

NDP MP Tracey Ramsey grew up on the water's edge in Essex County — and her love for the water has her pushing for a national strategy to protect freshwater across the country. According to Ramsey, the freshwater policies that currently exist haven't been updated since 1987 — too long, in her opinion.

First Nation in Yukon tests new machines to pull water from air

First Nation in Yukon tests new machines to pull water from air

The Liard First Nation in Yukon is testing a new method of obtaining clean water — pulling it out of the air. An atmospheric water generator installed in Watson Lake is gathering moisture from the air like a dehumidifier, then purifying it for drinking by using UV light. When working properly, the machine can generate 30 litres a day, which is enough for a family's daily needs.

Calgary learned lessons from Winnipeg on how to deal with frozen water pipes

Calgary learned lessons from Winnipeg on how to deal with frozen water pipes

As Calgary dealt with a particularly frigid winter and a series of stubbornly frozen water lines, it turned for advice to a place that's used to dealing with such things.
Winnipeg.
"Winnipeg has probably a lot more expertise in this area than we do, because it's something they experience fairly routinely," said Chris Huston, the manager of drinking water distribution with the City of Calgary.
There were nearly 300 cases of frozen water-service lines this winter in Calgary, Huston said, and dozens remain frozen even now, despite the arrival of spring.

Carry The Kettle water treatment plant fire ruled undetermined

Carry The Kettle water treatment plant fire ruled undetermined

The cause of the fire that destroyed the water treatment facility on Carry The Kettle Nakoda Nation has been ruled undetermined by Saskatchewan First Nation Emergency Management.
The facility was destroyed in February, leaving roughly 1,500 people without water.
According to Kimbal Ironstar, the First Nation’s projects manager, within three days of the fire they were able to hook up untreated well water and restore running water.

Rothesay mayor says cost of switching water systems shouldn't be put on tenants

Rothesay mayor says cost of switching water systems shouldn't be put on tenants

The mayor of Rothesay says she's disappointed apartment owners have decided to pass the cost of switching their buildings to the municipal water system on to tenants.
"I don't think residents can afford that," said Rothesay Mayor Nancy Grant. "I think there might be other ways for apartment owners to handle that."
The city passed a bylaw requiring apartment building owners to switch to the municipal water system from well water and pay a consumption tax based on the amount of water used. Council approved the changes in March and sent a letter to apartment owners.

Water Act contentious at environment debate

Water Act contentious at environment debate

The Water Act, passed in the P.E.I. Legislature but not yet proclaimed, was one of the more divisive issues of the first leaders debate of the provincial election campaign.
More than 250 people packed into an auditorium at UPEI to listen to the leaders discuss environmental issues, at a forum organized by Island environmental groups. 
Topics ranged from protecting soil quality, to watershed group funding, to increasing the number of protected areas on P.E.I., to promoting the Island's natural history. 

'It'll be a tougher summer': Vancouver Island reservoirs low after dry winter

'It'll be a tougher summer': Vancouver Island reservoirs low after dry winter

B.C. Hydro is preparing for lower water levels in some Vancouver Island reservoirs and watersheds in the coming months, after a particularly dry winter.
Both the Puntledge and Campbell rivers are running low and that impacts everything from salmon runs to boating tourists, as well as electric utility operations.

Canada failed at monitoring waste dumps from mining companies

Canada failed at monitoring waste dumps from mining companies

Canada's federal environment and fisheries departments failed at monitoring waste dumps by mining companies and did not always check if these firms were carrying out plans to save fish from lethal chemicals, Canada's environment commissioner has found.

The secret of Whitefish River First Nation's award winning drinking water

The secret of Whitefish River First Nation's award winning drinking water

While some remote Indigenous communities are still struggling with boil water advisories and crumbling infrastructure, a community north of Manitoulin Island has some of the best drinking water in the province. Since 2012, Whitefish River First Nation has won the Water Taste Challenge five times. The award is handed out to the First Nation with the cleanest water. It's an honour that community members take pride in.

Laced with fear: why some Ontario First Nations don't trust tap water or eat the fish

Laced with fear: why some Ontario First Nations don't trust tap water or eat the fish

Water is something most Canadians take for granted. We have so much of it, it's no wonder. Per capita, our country has the world's third-largest freshwater reserves, but yet in many Indigenous communities, water can be difficult to access, at-risk because of unreliable treatment systems, or contaminated. That's the case in Delaware First Nation, an Indigenous community of about 500 people an hour southwest of London, Ont., a place where fishing was everything 60 years ago.