Quebec

St. Lawrence water levels could wash away more than $1B

St. Lawrence water levels could wash away more than $1B

Rising water levels in the St. Lawrence Seaway could cost the economy more than $1 billion, shippers and port operators say. A new study from the Chamber of Marine Commerce warns that opening the floodgates further at a dam in Cornwall, Ont., would wash away between $1 billion and $1.75 billion in revenue for businesses on both sides of the border. A board of control recently increased the flow at the Moses Saunders Dam — the only control point on the St. Lawrence Seaway, which includes the Great Lakes — to allow 10,400 cubic metres of water per second out of Lake Ontario.

'Canadians helping Canadians': Albertans raise $45K to help clean up Ottawa-Gatineau floods

'Canadians helping Canadians': Albertans raise $45K to help clean up Ottawa-Gatineau floods

Some Calgary business owners are teaming up to help flood victims in the Ottawa-Gatineau region. "Absolutely not kidding. Brought a tear to my eye, absolutely devastating," is how Terry Rawn describes the situation in Rhoddy's Bay, outside of Ottawa. The region has been hit hard by spring flooding in the Ottawa valley — more than 5,000 homes flooded last month.

Open-pit mine near Abitibi's pristine water source gets environmental review, but residents remain wary

Open-pit mine near Abitibi's pristine water source gets environmental review, but residents remain wary

A proposed open-pit mine near a pristine water source in northern Quebec will get a full public review, Quebec's environment minister announced last week. But around 200 people still protested this weekend in Amos, 600 kilometres north of Montreal, saying they intend to make sure the provincial government keeps its promise.

Heating oil drains into Ottawa River after spill in downtown Gatineau, Que.

Heating oil drains into Ottawa River after spill in downtown Gatineau, Que.

An undetermined amount of heating oil has ended up in the Ottawa River after a spill in downtown Gatineau, Que., near the offices of the provincial environment ministry. The spill happened at 170 rue de l'Hôtel de Ville during a delivery Friday, according to an email from ministry spokesperson Alexandre Ouellet, the regional director of the Outaouais Environmental Control Center.

A proposed lithium mine in a Quebec town galvanizes residents who fear for their water supply

A proposed lithium mine in a Quebec town galvanizes residents who fear for their water supply

A proposed open-pit lithium mine in northwestern Quebec has triggered community tension and calls for the provincial government to order an independent environmental review with public hearings. An Australian firm, Sayona Mining Ltd., is the proponent that is proposing to build the Authier lithium mine project. Some residents and environmentalists who live nearby say they are worried most about whether the proposed mine, planned at the foot of the Saint-Mathieu-Berry esker, a geological formation of glacial rocks in the Abitibi-Témiscamingue region, would jeopardize their local water supply. 

A proposed mine near a pristine water source is testing the CAQ's commitment to the environment

A proposed mine near a pristine water source is testing the CAQ's commitment to the environment

The 500 residents of La Motte, Que., don't have have a gas station or even a convenience store, but they do enjoy some of the best-tasting drinking water in North America. So when an Australian mining firm began seeking approval to build an open-air lithium mine just a stone's throw from the community's water source, reactions were decidedly mixed in the town, located 50 kilometres northwest of Val-d'Or.

Raw sewage dump in St. Lawrence River branded preposterous and perverse

Raw sewage dump in St. Lawrence River branded preposterous and perverse

Environmentalists are outraged by a "preposterous" large sewage dump into the St. Lawrence River near Montreal and a "staggering" number of smaller, chronic sewage overflows throughout the year in Quebec. They are calling on municipal and provincial governments to be more ambitious in their attempts to monitor and mitigate the release of toxic wastewater in waterways.

What if Ottawa spends $2B on water for First Nations and it still isn’t safe for everyone to drink?

What if Ottawa spends $2B on water for First Nations and it still isn’t safe for everyone to drink?

A green dot. That’s the symbol the federal government uses for this First Nation in the Gatineau River Valley. An online map that tracks one of the Liberal administration’s signature pledges — to rid First Nations of warnings that their tap water is dirty and unsafe — marks Kitigan Zibi with a green dot, like a traffic signal, indicating Mission Accomplished.