Neskantaga First Nation

Neskantaga First Nation evacuees can return home, officials say

Neskantaga First Nation evacuees can return home, officials say

Evacuees from Neskantaga First Nation started returning home Monday after recent water testing showed chlorine and microbiological levels were at acceptable levels after a new pump was installed in the local water system. The previous piece of equipment malfunctioned earlier in September, triggering a state of emergency. About 220 residents were in Thunder Bay for more than a week after the pump went down on Sept. 14. Chief Chris Moonias called for the evacuation himself, concerned about symptoms he said were showing up in community members, including skin rashes, stomach problems and headaches.

Ontario First Nation evacuates community over water safety, asks feds for help

Ontario First Nation evacuates community over water safety, asks feds for help

An abrupt downturn in an already poor water-quality situation in a northwestern Ontario Indigenous community poses more of a safety risk than the federal government is willing to acknowledge, representatives of the First Nation said Wednesday as they called for help covering the cost of evacuating the community. Most of the 250 residents of the Neskantaga First Nation, a member of the Nishnawbe Aski Nation, flew out of the community on the weekend after untreated water began flowing from local taps and water pressure tapered off dramatically.

Frustration grows in Neskantaga First Nation as dream of clean drinking water turns muddy

Frustration grows in Neskantaga First Nation as dream of clean drinking water turns muddy

Moonias said Indigenous Services needs to work with them to get a new contractor who will complete the project. He’s calling for a shutdown of the reverse osmosis system – and a return to bottled water to all homes instead.