New Brunswick

6 west Saint John neighbourhoods to switch to east side water system

6 west Saint John neighbourhoods to switch to east side water system

Less than two years after switching Saint John's west side to a new drinking water system, the city is now diverting many of those same neighbourhoods to a new water source. The areas affected include Saint John's lower west side, Milford, Randolph, Fundy Heights, Duck Cove and Sand Cove. They are to begin receiving surface water from the Loch Lomond Treatment plant on the city's east side by the end of the year. At the same time the city has cancelled its contract with the engineering firm that was instrumental in the creation of the west side well field water system and hired a law firm to pursue the company, BGC Engineering, for costs.

St. Lawrence water levels could wash away more than $1B

St. Lawrence water levels could wash away more than $1B

Rising water levels in the St. Lawrence Seaway could cost the economy more than $1 billion, shippers and port operators say. A new study from the Chamber of Marine Commerce warns that opening the floodgates further at a dam in Cornwall, Ont., would wash away between $1 billion and $1.75 billion in revenue for businesses on both sides of the border. A board of control recently increased the flow at the Moses Saunders Dam — the only control point on the St. Lawrence Seaway, which includes the Great Lakes — to allow 10,400 cubic metres of water per second out of Lake Ontario.

P.E.I. businesses, public buildings encouraged to provide free tap water

P.E.I. businesses, public buildings encouraged to provide free tap water

The creator of the Blue W program is encouraging more P.E.I. businesses and public buildings to offer free tap water, in part to reduce the use of plastic water bottles. The Blue W program uses an interactive map to indicate locations where people can fill their reusable bottle without feeling compelled to make additional purchases. 

West Saint John leaks caused by water source changeover, says report

West Saint John leaks caused by water source changeover, says report

A new $40 thousand report concludes scaly material that built up over decades in the water pipes of west Saint John homes was weakened by a change in the water source, which eventually caused leaks. The report follows over 200 complaints of leaking pipes and a series of angry public meetings that concluded in an ongoing class action lawsuit.

Water-main break in Nackawic prompts boil order, closes 2 schools

Water-main break in Nackawic prompts boil order, closes 2 schools

A water-main break in Nackawic early Monday morning has prompted a boil order for some residents and closed two schools for the day. The order affects only those on lower Landegger Drive, according to a post on the town's Facebook page. Nackawic High School and Nackawic Middle School are closed because of the break, a town official said.

Moncton could spend $27M on 'worst case' algae fix

Moncton could spend $27M on 'worst case' algae fix

Moncton's $77.6-million capital budget sets aside millions to deal with blue-green algae in the municipal water supply. Jack MacDonald, Moncton's general manager of engineering and environmental services, said the city will work with Dalhousie University to study whether a water purification system could be added at the treatment plant to handle the algae.

Neighbours claim Saint John's new water treatment plant ruined their wells

Neighbours claim Saint John's new water treatment plant ruined their wells

For well over a year, Rob and Connie Crow have struggled to keep their failing water well from quitting altogether. First the water softener stopped working. They discovered the water coming from the well carried a gritty substance that left an oily film on their hands. Rob shrugs when asked what it is. "I can guarantee you it's not good for you," he said.

No-swimming advisories not stopping people from taking a dip at Parlee Beach

No-swimming advisories not stopping people from taking a dip at Parlee Beach

A no-swimming advisory during the entire New Brunswick Day weekend didn't stop beachgoers from taking a dip at Parlee Beach. Water samples turned up with high levels of fecal bacteria three days in a row — from water tested Thursday, Friday and Saturday. But the beach was busy, with lifeguards watching over it and many children swimming in the water.

Glyphosate will not be sprayed near Greater Moncton's water supply this year

Glyphosate will not be sprayed near Greater Moncton's water supply this year

The provincial government did not issue a permit to spray the controversial herbicide glyphosate this year near the Turtle Creek Watershed, the water source for greater Moncton. The decision comes after an outcry from Moncton Mayor Dawn Arnold last August. 'Well, I'm pretty excited," Arnold said after learning the news over the weekend.

Saint John says it won't know water system costs until project is done

Saint John says it won't know water system costs until project is done

The City of Saint John will not provide an update on how much its long-awaited "safe, clean drinking water" system will cost. A CBC news right-to-information request reveals that the figure isn't publicly available. The request resulted in 2,100 pages of documents about the project, with most records of price blacked out.

Online magazine calls Parlee Beach one of the most polluted in the world

Online magazine calls Parlee Beach one of the most polluted in the world

A recent article listing the popular destination as one of the dirtiest beaches in the world could keep people away from the beach if the weather improves.  Word of its water quality issues is spreading.
“The Insider” is an online publication that compiles travel tips and information from different groups who travel the world. It has lumped the New Brunswick attraction with others from Senegal to India and Hawaii as among the most polluted on the planet.

Ground-breaking First Nations Water Authority takes first steps in Atlantic region

Ground-breaking First Nations Water Authority takes first steps in Atlantic region

The Atlantic First Nations Water Authority has taken its first steps with the appointment of a First Nations board of directors from Nova Scotia, New Brunswick and Prince Edward Island.

West Saint John group asks integrity commissioner to force release of water information

West Saint John group asks integrity commissioner to force release of water information

A group of residents in west Saint John is calling on the province's integrity commissioner to order the city and the Department of Environment to immediately release documents related to their new water source as many continue to deal with hard water, leaking pipes and costly repairs.