Canada

Water shortages and yearly floods: Canada won’t escape climate crisis, UN report says

Water shortages and yearly floods: Canada won’t escape climate crisis, UN report says

Damage to Earth’s oceans and glaciers from climate change is outpacing the ability of governments to protect them, a new report from an international scientific panel concludes. “The capacity of governance systems in polar and ocean regions to respond to climate change impacts has strengthened recently,” says the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. “But this development is not sufficiently rapid or robust to adequately address the scale of increasing projected risks.”

Shoal Lake JV to build new water, wastewater system

Shoal Lake JV to build new water, wastewater system

SHOAL LAKE, ONT. — A joint venture (JV) involving Shoal Lake 40 Contractors LP and Sigfusson Northern Ltd. has been named the winning bidder in a competition to earn the right to construct a new water and wastewater system for Shoal Lake First Nation in northwestern Ontario. Indigenous Services Canada is contributing $33 million for the project, which includes construction of a water treatment plant, reservoir, raw water intake structure and lift station as well as the installation of watermain connections and fire hydrants, stated a Sept. 6 release.

A second chance: Canada, U.S. renegotiate a critical water treaty

A second chance: Canada, U.S. renegotiate a critical water treaty

The Columbia River Treaty, an international agreement governing the flow of water between British Columbia and six U.S. states, will be 55 years old this year. It has not aged well. The river springs from the Columbia Icefield in the Rocky Mountains of B.C. and winds 1,930 kilometres through the Northwestern United States – Washington, Oregon, Idaho, Montana, Nevada and Wyoming. No other river in North America spills more water into the Pacific Ocean.

Cross-border dam generates no power, but its uncertain fate fuels anxiety

Cross-border dam generates no power, but its uncertain fate fuels anxiety

The tiny Forest City dam on the border between Maine and New Brunswick doesn't look like much more than a pile of rusting iron and aged lumber. Plants and weeds grow throughout the rock-and-crib-style dam, which is home to a family of weasels, a rudimentary passage for fish and is used in summer by local kids to float inner tubes through its gates. The dam itself doesn't generate electricity. It was built to help loggers float their timber to local mills. But its three gates have maintained the waters of East Grand Lake on New Brunswick's western border at consistent levels for almost 180 years.

Portable water testing kits can be used for 'citizen science' across Canada

Portable water testing kits can be used for 'citizen science' across Canada

Over the last few years, WWF Canada conducted research that showed information on the health of Canada's water was lacking across the country. "We found that 65 per cent of our watersheds didn't have enough data available to understand the health of them," said Heather Crochetiere, senior fresh water specialist at WWF Canada.

Hundreds of Winnipeg walkers call for clean drinking water on First Nations

Hundreds of Winnipeg walkers call for clean drinking water on First Nations

Over a thousand people poured into the streets of downtown Winnipeg Friday to bring attention to the dozens of First Nations across Canada currently under boil water advisories. Roughly 1,100 people, including more than 800 students from the Seven Oaks School Division, took part, organizers estimate. Carrying signs, the demonstrators walked from city hall down Main Street to Portage Avenue, and then up Memorial Boulevard, before ending at the Manitoba Legislative Building.

Calgary learned lessons from Winnipeg on how to deal with frozen water pipes

Calgary learned lessons from Winnipeg on how to deal with frozen water pipes

As Calgary dealt with a particularly frigid winter and a series of stubbornly frozen water lines, it turned for advice to a place that's used to dealing with such things.
Winnipeg.
"Winnipeg has probably a lot more expertise in this area than we do, because it's something they experience fairly routinely," said Chris Huston, the manager of drinking water distribution with the City of Calgary.
There were nearly 300 cases of frozen water-service lines this winter in Calgary, Huston said, and dozens remain frozen even now, despite the arrival of spring.

Water Act contentious at environment debate

Water Act contentious at environment debate

The Water Act, passed in the P.E.I. Legislature but not yet proclaimed, was one of the more divisive issues of the first leaders debate of the provincial election campaign.
More than 250 people packed into an auditorium at UPEI to listen to the leaders discuss environmental issues, at a forum organized by Island environmental groups. 
Topics ranged from protecting soil quality, to watershed group funding, to increasing the number of protected areas on P.E.I., to promoting the Island's natural history. 

'A new normal': decreasing ice cover on the Great Lakes

'A new normal': decreasing ice cover on the Great Lakes

The changes caused by declining ice cover on the Great Lakes are pretty bad, but it's not all doom and gloom. Ice cover on the Great Lakes has declined in the past 40 years with average ice coverage dropping up to 75 per cent, depending on the lake. "We rely a lot on the Great Lakes for shipping ... so an ice-free Great Lake is not a barrier to shipping. But beyond that there are a lot of negatives associated," said Mike McKay, the executive director for the Great Lakes Institute for Environmental Research (GLIER), based at the University of Windsor.

Dr. Hans Peterson remembered for bringing safe drinking water to thousands

Dr. Hans Peterson remembered for bringing safe drinking water to thousands

A pioneer in safe drinking water is being remembered for changing thousands of lives. Dr. Hans Peterson died of a heart attack last week at the age of 68. Peterson helped found the Safe Drinking Water Foundation (SDWF) and pioneered the development of the Integrated Biological and Reverse Osmosis Membrane (IBROM) water treatment process.

Canadians worried about proposed Coventry landfill expansion

Canadians worried about proposed Coventry landfill expansion

Those concerns have grown since testing revealed elevated levels of PFAS chemicals, including PFOA, in the groundwater near an unlined, closed portion of the landfill. Those chemicals are used in industrial applications. Conservation Law Foundation is asking Vermont to delay the permit application process until that testing is complete.

CANADA IN 2030: Future of our water and changing coastlines

CANADA IN 2030: Future of our water and changing coastlines

Flooding in New Brunswick, drought in the Prairies, disappearing permafrost in the North, and the oceans creeping up on our coasts - the reality of a changing climate in Canada is becoming harder to ignore, and the United Nations has stated that it is the biggest systematic threat to humanity.

Want common ground on First Nations issues? Start by fixing the water supply

Want common ground on First Nations issues? Start by fixing the water supply

Most Canadians agree that reserves in their provinces are generally in bad shape and that the Indigenous people living off reserves in their provinces face a more difficult set of circumstances than their non-Indigenous neighbours.