British Columbia

Canada’s Indigenous pipe dream might end Trudeau’s Trans Mountain nightmare

Canada’s Indigenous pipe dream might end Trudeau’s Trans Mountain nightmare

An Indigenous-led group plans to offer to buy a majority stake in the Trans Mountain oil pipeline from the Canadian government this week or next, a deal that could help Prime Minister Justin Trudeau mitigate election-year criticism from environmentalists. The group, called Project Reconciliation, aims to submit the $6.9 billion offer as early as Friday, managing director Stephen Mason told Reuters, and start negotiations with Ottawa two weeks later. Project Reconciliation said the investment will alleviate First Nations poverty, a watershed for Indigenous people who have historically watched Canada’s resources enrich others.

Water, water everywhere, but mostly down the drain: How Vancouver is trying to plug excessive water use

Water, water everywhere, but mostly down the drain: How Vancouver is trying to plug excessive water use

Water in Metro Vancouver might seem like a limitless resource, but it's time for that notion to go down the drain. When it comes to home water use — for drinking, bathing, toilet flushing and more — Metro Vancouver is a pretty thirsty place. Residential water use in Metro Vancouver is 270 litres per capita per day. That's less than the City of Montreal's 286 litres per capita per day, but more than Toronto's 219 per day or the 210 per day used by residents of Calgary. So how do the thirsty residents of Metro Vancouver use all that wet stuff?

Why Vancouverites need to stop treating their water supply like a 'buffet'

Why Vancouverites need to stop treating their water supply like a 'buffet'

Vancouver is known for rain and snow-capped mountains, both of which supply the city's water reservoirs. But as climate change continues to alter weather patterns and reduce rainfall, the supply will dwindle and Uytae Lee is thirsty for action to be taken now. Metro Vancouver is also predicting another one million people will arrive in the region by 2050 and predicts a water "supply gap" by 2030.

Liberals’ water pledges ring hollow for some B.C. First Nations still without drinking water

Liberals’ water pledges ring hollow for some B.C. First Nations still without drinking water

The elected leader of a remote First Nation in B.C. which has been under a boil-water order for 18 years says he’s confident his community will eventually find a solution to its drinking water woes — regardless of which party is elected federally this year. Chief Jimmy Lulua’s comments to the Star came a day after Canada’s new Indigenous Services minister boasted Ottawa has made “progress” on the First Nations drinking water crisis to mark World Water Day on Friday.

Amnesty uses World Water Day to highlight environmental racism in Canada

Amnesty uses World Water Day to highlight environmental racism in Canada

“Far too often, governments in Canada have demonstrated that they place little value on the health and well-being of Indigenous peoples and the revitalization of their cultures and traditions,” Tara Scurr, business and human rights campaigner with Amnesty International Canada, said in a statement Thursday.

Semiahmoo First Nation takes first step toward new water system

Semiahmoo First Nation takes first step toward new water system

The construction of a modest road into a small community wouldn't usually get a full ground-breaking photo op, complete with gold-coloured shovels and government officials. But for the Semiahmoo First Nation, the road work is just the first step toward new water infrastructure that will end the community's 15-year permanent boil water advisory. "I'm waiting for a day to be able to turn on a tap and drink a glass of water," said Harley Chappell, Semiahmoo's elected chief. "That's the goal."

UBC researchers develop inexpensive tool to test drinking water

UBC researchers develop inexpensive tool to test drinking water

A handheld ‘tricorder’ that can test for biological contamination in real-time has been the dream of science fiction fans for decades. And UBC Okanagan engineers say the technology is closer to science fact than ever before. Using a small and inexpensive biosensor, researchers in the School of Engineering have developed a novel low-cost technique that quickly and accurately detects cryptosporidium contamination in water samples.

New rules for B.C. farmers take aim at agricultural waste

New rules for B.C. farmers take aim at agricultural waste

B.C.'s Ministry of Environment and Climate Change Strategy is announcing new rules for farmers, intended to protect water sources and "provide more clarity for the agricultural sector." According to the ministry, the rules will protect groundwater with proper manure and nutrient storage, ban direct discharges, allow increased monitoring in high-risk areas, and require record keeping.

'Isn't this Canada?' Union Bay residents banned from public meeting

'Isn't this Canada?' Union Bay residents banned from public meeting

Union Bay resident Kathy Calder wants to know why she can't drink her tap water. Her community, in the Comox Valley on Vancouver Island, has been on a boil water advisory for more than a month. Calder was looking forward to asking some questions at Thursday night's Union Bay Improvement District [UBID] public meeting. However, a letter posted to the district's website Jan. 10 says residents are banned from attending the public meeting, which consists of elected officials.

Pipeline battle puts focus on Canada's disputed right to use indigenous land

Pipeline battle puts focus on Canada's disputed right to use indigenous land

The protesters in northern British Columbia had camped out for days amid bitter cold and deep snow, manning a checkpoint to prevent construction vehicles from entering the territory of the Wet’suwet’en nation. Their demonstrations, part of a fight against a multibillion-dollar natural gas pipeline, galvanized supporters across the country and at his town hall meeting, the prime minister was forced to content with a barrage of angry questions.

B.C. MP hopes Parliament passes private member's bill on plastic pollution

B.C. MP hopes Parliament passes private member's bill on plastic pollution

A Vancouver Island MP is hoping the federal government will pass his private member's motion that would create legislation to keep plastic pollution out of Canadian waters. "People are counting on elected officials and their leaders to ... demonstrate their commitment to future generations [by] protecting our environment and ensuring that we don't leave them a pile of garbage for them to clean up," said Gord Johns, MP for Courtenay-Alberni.

Communities in the Comox Valley Regional District to benefit from cleaner, more reliable drinking water

Communities in the Comox Valley Regional District to benefit from cleaner, more reliable drinking water

The governments of Canada and British Columbia recognize how important investing in modern reliable water services is to building healthy sustainable communities. Today, Marco Mendicino, Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Infrastructure and Communities, on behalf of the Honourable François-Philippe Champagne, and Ronna Rae Leonard, Member of Legislative Assembly for Courtenay–Comox, on behalf of the Honourable Selina Robinson, B.C. Minister of Municipal Affairs and Housing, announced more than $62.8 million in federal-provincial funding for a new drinking water treatment plant in the Comox Valley Regional District (CVRD).

Dry lakes and dust storms: Dramatic changes to Yukon glaciers are warning for planet, researchers say

Dry lakes and dust storms: Dramatic changes to Yukon glaciers are warning for planet, researchers say

Gwenn Flowers, a glaciologist, trudges back and forth across a vast glacier in southwest Yukon, pulling a radar device mounted on skis behind her. "We as Canadians are stewards of about a third of the world's mountain glaciers and ice caps, so this is our responsibility," Flowers says. The dramatic changes to the glaciers in the Yukon are an early warning of what climate change could mean for the rest of the planet, researchers say. And Flowers sees lots of reason for concern reflected in the state of the ice.

Soot-filled rivers a concern following wildfires

Soot-filled rivers a concern following wildfires

During the record-breaking 2018 fire season, the typically clear waters of Cameron Falls in Waterton Lakes National Park in southern Alberta flowed black. But it had nothing to do with the extensive fires that torched much of British Columbia and a small part of Waterton.

Two-thirds of Kelowna candidates support water system integration

Two-thirds of Kelowna candidates support water system integration

The vast majority of Kelowna City Council candidates support the further integration of water suppliers. The city recently amalgamated with the South East Kelowna Irrigation District but still only provides water to 50 per cent of residents. Irrigation districts in Glenmore-Ellison, Black Mountain and Rutland serve most of the rest of Kelowna (there are 26 small systems supplying about 1,300 residents). The city wants to bring all water under its umbrella and integrate all the systems.

Trans Mountain pipeline in limbo as Federal Court of Appeal orders Canada fix ‘flawed’ project

Trans Mountain pipeline in limbo as Federal Court of Appeal orders Canada fix ‘flawed’ project

The Coldwater Indian Band, which asserts traditional territories in south-central B.C., said the pipeline route passes an aquifer that is the sole supply of drinking water for its main reserve “This is a major victory for my community,” said Coldwater Chief Lee Spahan. “Thankfully, the court has stepped in where Canada has failed to protect and respect our rights and our water.”

A B.C. reserve has been 17 years without safe drinking water. Many don’t even have tap water

A B.C. reserve has been 17 years without safe drinking water. Many don’t even have tap water

Recently elected Xeni Gwet’in chief Jimmy Lulua doesn’t have running water in his own house. He brushes his teeth from a cup. It is a daily reminder of how precious water is to his people — but, he noted, “It’s not by choice.”

“We’ve never been high on the government’s priority list,” he said. “We live in a third world country in one of the richest countries in the world.”

Semiahmoo First Nation to have safe drinking water

Semiahmoo First Nation to have safe drinking water

Semiahmoo First Nation could have potable water – something they haven’t had in more than a decade – as early as next spring, after signing a pair of servicing agreements with the City of Surrey Monday. The agreements, signed at Surrey’s council meeting, also mean sanitary-sewer infrastructure and water for fire protection for the first time in the nation’s history.

Source Water Protection Plan Endorsed

Source Water Protection Plan Endorsed

Document intended to protect Whistler's biggest water supply. The Resort Municipality of Whistler (RMOW) is taking steps to protect the community's biggest water source. At its July 10 meeting, council endorsed the 21 Mile Creek Watershed Source Water Protection Plan (SWPP)—a document intended to mitigate risks and minimize exposure to unacceptable concentrations of contaminants in the water supply.