wells

Rothesay mayor says cost of switching water systems shouldn't be put on tenants

Rothesay mayor says cost of switching water systems shouldn't be put on tenants

The mayor of Rothesay says she's disappointed apartment owners have decided to pass the cost of switching their buildings to the municipal water system on to tenants.
"I don't think residents can afford that," said Rothesay Mayor Nancy Grant. "I think there might be other ways for apartment owners to handle that."
The city passed a bylaw requiring apartment building owners to switch to the municipal water system from well water and pay a consumption tax based on the amount of water used. Council approved the changes in March and sent a letter to apartment owners.

Ontario cheesemakers work to cut down water use

Ontario cheesemakers work to cut down water use

Cheesemakers in Ontario are taking a hard look at their water use with an eye to improving quality and sustainability. Though the industry is considered a "medium" water consumer by experts, an estimated 10,000 litres of water go into producing a single pound of cheese when the entire production line is taken into account. 

Rules for high-capacity wells not included in new Water Act consultations

Rules for high-capacity wells not included in new Water Act consultations

The P.E.I. government released two different sets of regulations for the province's Water Act for public consultation Tuesday, but opposition parties wanted to draw attention to regulations which were not released to the public.

Bottled water sent to drought-stricken region of Nova Scotia

Bottled water sent to drought-stricken region of Nova Scotia

The Nova Scotia government is buying bottled water and dispatching tanker trucks to a southwestern stretch of the province grappling with an extended drought. The Emergency Management Office said it has been working in Argyle, Barrington and Yarmouth to make sure people whose wells have run dry have access to drinking water.

What if Ottawa spends $2B on water for First Nations and it still isn’t safe for everyone to drink?

What if Ottawa spends $2B on water for First Nations and it still isn’t safe for everyone to drink?

A green dot. That’s the symbol the federal government uses for this First Nation in the Gatineau River Valley. An online map that tracks one of the Liberal administration’s signature pledges — to rid First Nations of warnings that their tap water is dirty and unsafe — marks Kitigan Zibi with a green dot, like a traffic signal, indicating Mission Accomplished.