provincial government

'It's a problem for society': Climate change is making some homes uninsurable

'It's a problem for society': Climate change is making some homes uninsurable

As an insurer, Intact obviously has its own data and maps. Based on that, the company assumes as many as five per cent of those newly at-risk properties will be simply uninsurable. Brindamour warns that "if you're in a zone that gets flooded repeatedly, or where the odds of being flooded has increased meaningfully, it'll be hard to find insurance from private capital."

Kruger hauls decades-old barrels from the depths of Deer Lake's water supply

Kruger hauls decades-old barrels from the depths of Deer Lake's water supply

Fifty-five metal barrels, left for decades to deteriorate at the bottom of the Humber Canal, are seeing the light of day this week as Corner Brook Pulp and Paper undertakes a big cleanup. The debris predates the mill's current ownership under Kruger, but the company estimates they've been decaying since about the 1950s, although their presence went undetected until residents raised red flags two years ago. The 11-kilometre canal supplies the Deer Lake Powerhouse, which in turn generates electricity for the mill, and also does double duty as the town of Deer Lake's water supply.

Municipal Affairs and Environment Minister Graham Letto says communities should notify residents and take action to correct water quality issues

Municipal Affairs and Environment Minister Graham Letto says communities should notify residents and take action to correct water quality issues

“If you are above the Health Canada standards (which have been the same since 2006), by God you should be informing your residents that is the case,” said the minister. “For liability and accountability purposes, you should be doing that and municipalities have to take some responsibility in that.”

Ground broken for water improvement project in Kelowna

Ground broken for water improvement project in Kelowna

A ground-breaking ceremony was held in Kelowna today for a multi-million dollar project that will improve water quality in the city’s southeast district. The multi-year project involves separating agricultural and domestic systems in southeast Kelowna and providing a sustainable water supply for agriculture in South Mission. The federal government is providing $26.45 million while the provincial government is providing $17.457 million for the project through the Clean Water and Wastewater Fund. The City of Kelowna says its costs will be $19.1 million.

Saint John says it won't know water system costs until project is done

Saint John says it won't know water system costs until project is done

The City of Saint John will not provide an update on how much its long-awaited "safe, clean drinking water" system will cost. A CBC news right-to-information request reveals that the figure isn't publicly available. The request resulted in 2,100 pages of documents about the project, with most records of price blacked out.