water treatment plants

First Nation in Yukon tests new machines to pull water from air

First Nation in Yukon tests new machines to pull water from air

The Liard First Nation in Yukon is testing a new method of obtaining clean water — pulling it out of the air. An atmospheric water generator installed in Watson Lake is gathering moisture from the air like a dehumidifier, then purifying it for drinking by using UV light. When working properly, the machine can generate 30 litres a day, which is enough for a family's daily needs.

Spring run-off to blame for Edmonton's smelly tap water

Spring run-off to blame for Edmonton's smelly tap water

If your tap water smells like chlorine, your schnozz has sniffed out a common springtime phenomenon in Edmonton. The spring thaw has made the city's drinking water more pungent than usual. Run-off from melting snow and river ice has washed higher than normal volumes of organic material into the water supply, said Shane Harnish, Epcor's senior manager of analytical operations. It's something workers at Edmonton's water treatment plants contend with every year. "What you're noticing is the chlorine smell in our water, and it's due to the chlorine reacting with some of this organic material," Harnish said in an interview Wednesday with CBC Radio's Edmonton AM.

Horse Lake First Nation Celebrates Grand Opening of a New Water Treatment System

Horse Lake First Nation Celebrates Grand Opening of a New Water Treatment System

Today, the Honourable Jane Philpott, Minister of Indigenous Services, congratulated Horse Lake First Nation on the opening of their new water treatment system. The new water treatment system in Horse Lake is critical to the community's efforts to ensure future generations have access to clean water. The new system features dual media filtration, reverse osmosis membranes, and ultra-violet light radiation.

Pilot project trains Indigenous youth to help tackle water challenges in their communities

Pilot project trains Indigenous youth to help tackle water challenges in their communities

Ten young people from First Nations around the Island [Manitoulin Island] are finishing up a 15-month paid internship through Water First, a Canadian charity dedicated to helping First Nations solve their water challenges.

How the private sector can boost First Nations infrastructure

How the private sector can boost First Nations infrastructure

Tellingly, Ms. Philpott publicly declared last fall that her department’s mandate is to make itself “obsolete” by empowering Indigenous groups to gain long-asked-for independence in providing services to their own communities. It’s clear that the goal is to assist First Nations to expand their role in operating and maintaining their own water systems.

Real-time monitoring technology could reduce boil-water advisories for First Nations, study finds

Real-time monitoring technology could reduce boil-water advisories for First Nations, study finds

A study by Ontario researchers suggests real-time monitoring technology at water treatment plants on reserves could significantly reduce the number of drinking-water advisories issued for First Nations across the country.

The trouble behind Canada's failed First Nations water plants

The trouble behind Canada's failed First Nations water plants

Behind every failed First Nations water plant is an unfortunate story. Assigning blame can be challenging: Although Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada (INAC) pays for most on-reserve infrastructure and sets most of the rules governing design and construction, many other parties are involved, including project managers, engineering and construction firms and First Nations chiefs and councillors.

Unsafe to drink

Unsafe to drink

Serpent River’s woes resemble those of the 90 other Canadian reserves under drinking-water advisories. But there is a cruel twist: This water treatment plant is barely a year old. It is a small yet impressive modern facility, a bewildering but orderly arrangement of pumps, piping and gauges.