Health Canada

Another Ontario First Nation declares a state of emergency over water

Another Ontario First Nation declares a state of emergency over water

Eabametoong First Nation, an Ojibway community that sits about 360 kilometres north of Thunder Bay, passed a band council resolution declaring a state of emergency Friday after water test results showed levels of trihalomethanes (THMs) between 122 to 182 per cent above Health Canada safety standards.
Yesno said residents are also reporting a foul smell coming from the community's tap water.

Hundreds of Calgary homes may have water contaminated with lead

Hundreds of Calgary homes may have water contaminated with lead

A Calgary mom was unnerved to find out she and her two young children may have been drinking and bathing in lead-contaminated water at their home for the past year — and hundreds of other Calgarians are in the same boat. "It's just unnerving that we've been there for a year and that we could have been drinking lead water for the last year. There's a bit of a panic," she said, adding the situation feels out of her control because the rents the house, which is in Hillhurst.

Changes coming to Regina's lead pipe program after new Health Canada guidelines

Changes coming to Regina's lead pipe program after new Health Canada guidelines

Changes are coming to the way the City of Regina manages the lead pipes that carry drinking water after changes to the Health Canada guidelines. According to a report presented to Regina's public works committee, in the coming year the city plans to increase lead pipe replacements, improve construction best-practices and improve record-keeping for city and privately owned lead pipe connections. The city will also explore the feasibility and implications of corrosion control and continue to educate the public about lead pipes.

Edmonton water bills could increase

Edmonton water bills could increase

EPCOR needs money to lower the lead levels in Edmonton’s drinking water – a cost that may wind up on residents water bills. Although officials from EPCOR and the city said the drinking water is safe, levels must be reduced to meet new federal regulations. Earlier this month Health Canada cut acceptable lead levels in half, from 10 micrograms per litre to five.

Get the lead out: City homes will be affected by new Health Canada regulations on lead in water

Get the lead out: City homes will be affected by new Health Canada regulations on lead in water

Looming changes to Health Canada’s acceptable concentration levels of lead in drinking water could see a wash of city homes creep above the recommended level, Epcor warned city council’s utility committee Thursday. Presently, it’s considered safe to have up to 10 micrograms per litre in drinking water. But Epcor officials said Thursday that the federal health agency is signalling it will lower that level to five micrograms per litre, a change that will affect more than 30,000 Edmonton homes.