toxins

Moncton lays groundwork to deal with cyanobacteria in water supply

Moncton lays groundwork to deal with cyanobacteria in water supply

Moncton plans to spend $6 million this winter to upgrade its water treatment plant, the first phase of a plan to deal with cyanobacteria in the municipal water supply. Cyanobacteria was found in 2017 in the Turtle Creek watershed, the drinking water source for Moncton, Dieppe and Riverview. Cyanobacteria, also known as blue-green algae, can form blooms and produce toxins harmful to humans and animals. The water remains safe to drink and the multimillion dollar upgrades are meant to keep it that way. 

Laced with fear: why some Ontario First Nations don't trust tap water or eat the fish

Laced with fear: why some Ontario First Nations don't trust tap water or eat the fish

Water is something most Canadians take for granted. We have so much of it, it's no wonder. Per capita, our country has the world's third-largest freshwater reserves, but yet in many Indigenous communities, water can be difficult to access, at-risk because of unreliable treatment systems, or contaminated. That's the case in Delaware First Nation, an Indigenous community of about 500 people an hour southwest of London, Ont., a place where fishing was everything 60 years ago.

Americans blame Canadians for delaying damning report on B.C. toxins in transboundary waters

Americans blame Canadians for delaying damning report on B.C. toxins in transboundary waters

Commission's Canadian members refused to endorse report on selenium in the Elk River watershed. United States officials are accusing their Canadian counterparts of sitting on damning new data about toxic chemicals from southern British Columbia coal mines in water shared by both countries.

Untreated sewage pollutes water across the country

Untreated sewage pollutes water across the country

Nearly 120 million cubic metres of untreated sewage and runoff entered Canadian waterways in 2016, StarMetro has learned.
That’s roughly the same amount of water that roars over the edge of Niagara Falls over the course of 12 hours — except it’s not whitewater spewing from these pipes. It’s murky, brown and a little bit chunky.