trihalomethanes

Indigenous communities face 'abhorrent' housing conditions, UN report finds

Indigenous communities face 'abhorrent' housing conditions, UN report finds

Indigenous people fare far worse than non-Indigenous populations when it comes to attaining safe and secure housing, both worldwide and here in Canada, according to a new United Nations report. The UN's special rapporteur on adequate housing, Ottawa's Leilani Farha, presented the report to the General Assembly Friday. It found that Indigenous communities lag behind when it comes to housing conditions and that their territories tend to be the "most disadvantaged in terms of access to infrastructure, including access to drinking water and sanitation, education and health services."

8-10 years to fix Attawapiskat water problems, chief estimates

8-10 years to fix Attawapiskat water problems, chief estimates

It's been one month since Attawapiskat First Nation declared a state of emergency over its poor water quality. The measure was taken in the northern Ontario community due to high levels of  trihalomethane (THMs) and haloacetic acids (HAAs) in the water the residents use for bathing and cooking. The fly-in community has a separate system for its drinking water.

NDP says province, Doug Ford need to 'step up to plate' during Attawapiskat water emergency

NDP says province, Doug Ford need to 'step up to plate' during Attawapiskat water emergency

People in Attawapiskat continue to speak out about their water problems with some high-profile visitors this week. Attawapiskat's Chief and Council declared a state of emergency more than a week ago when water tests came back with higher-than accepted levels of trihalomethanes. Exposure to trihalomethanes can be connected to an increased risk of bladder and possibly colon cancer in people who drank chlorinated water for 35 years or more.

Another Ontario First Nation declares a state of emergency over water

Another Ontario First Nation declares a state of emergency over water

Eabametoong First Nation, an Ojibway community that sits about 360 kilometres north of Thunder Bay, passed a band council resolution declaring a state of emergency Friday after water test results showed levels of trihalomethanes (THMs) between 122 to 182 per cent above Health Canada safety standards.
Yesno said residents are also reporting a foul smell coming from the community's tap water.

Attawapiskat residents want Canadian military help to deal with water 'state of emergency'

Attawapiskat residents want Canadian military help to deal with water 'state of emergency'

During an emotional community meeting Tuesday evening, residents of a northern Ontario First Nation grappling with water problems demanded their chief and council ask the Canadian military to step in. Attawapiskat Band Coun. Rosie Koostachin said community members passed a resolution at the meeting calling on their band council to request Ottawa bring in the Canadian Armed Forces' Disaster Assistance Response Team (DART) to provide clean water. 

Municipal Affairs and Environment Minister Graham Letto says communities should notify residents and take action to correct water quality issues

Municipal Affairs and Environment Minister Graham Letto says communities should notify residents and take action to correct water quality issues

“If you are above the Health Canada standards (which have been the same since 2006), by God you should be informing your residents that is the case,” said the minister. “For liability and accountability purposes, you should be doing that and municipalities have to take some responsibility in that.”