microplastics

Marine biologist offers Montreal festivals an alternative to single-use water bottles

Marine biologist offers Montreal festivals an alternative to single-use water bottles

Planning on attending Osheaga in Montreal this summer? Bring along a reusable water bottle and fill it up as often as you'd like — for free. You can do that now thanks to a local marine biologist and her determination to keep plastic out of the oceans. This summer, Rachel Labbé-Bellas is unveiling her new water-refill stations at the summer festival — water-refill stations she's dubbed The Green Stop, designed to discourage people from using single-use plastic bottles and inspire environmental awareness.

Study sheds light on human consumption of microplastics

Study sheds light on human consumption of microplastics

The study found that a person's average microplastic consumption — based on those food items previously analyzed — would likely be somewhere between 70,000 and 121,000 particles per year. While younger girls were at the lower end of the spectrum, adult men were at the high end. People who consume a lot of bottled water could see that number jump by up to 100,000 particles per year. 

Study finds evidence of microplastics in human gut, but health impacts unclear

Study finds evidence of microplastics in human gut, but health impacts unclear

In the first study of its kind, researchers say they have found evidence of tiny plastic particles in the human gut. Austrian researchers analyzed stool samples of eight people from different countries and found that all of them tested positive for at least one microplastic. On average, there were 20 microplastic particles found per 10 grams of stool.

Untreated sewage pollutes water across the country

Untreated sewage pollutes water across the country

Nearly 120 million cubic metres of untreated sewage and runoff entered Canadian waterways in 2016, StarMetro has learned.
That’s roughly the same amount of water that roars over the edge of Niagara Falls over the course of 12 hours — except it’s not whitewater spewing from these pipes. It’s murky, brown and a little bit chunky.