Resources Related to Drinking Water Quality


Check out this interactive infographic about water scarcity:

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We have worked with Healthy House on the Block (http://healthyhouseontheblock.com/) to provide a Healthy Drinking Water Tool Box on our website. The Healthy Drinking Water Tool Box includes a general checklist; a maintenance checklist; a private well maintenance checklist & worksheet; a water worksheet where you can track your water softener maintenance, water filter maintenance, water main inspection, and water pressure check; and more.


 

FIND YOUR COMMUNITY'S WATER QUALITY TEST RESULTS

Contact information for drinking water related authorities and offices in each provincial and territorial government can be found at https://www.ec.gc.ca/eau-water/default.asp?lang=En&n=24C5BD18-1

Alberta, British Columbia, Newfoundland and Labrador, Northwest Territories, and Saskatchewan also have water quality testing information available online. This can be accessed by following the directions below.

Alberta

http://www.environment.alberta.ca/apps/RegulatedDWQ/Listing.aspx

Find your community in the alphabetical list and click on it. Choose a month from the drop down list and then click on “Get Summary Report”. This report includes testing data for E. coli and coliform bacteria.

British Columbia

Begin by checking the map found here, http://www2.gov.bc.ca/gov/content/health/about-bc-s-health-care-system/partners/health-authorities/regional-health-authorities to see in which Health Authority area your community is located. If you are in the Fraser, Interior, Northern, or Vancouver Island regions then you can follow the directions below.

Fraser Health

http://www.healthspace.ca/fha/drinkingwater

Find and click on your community in the list on the left hand side of this site. This will take you to a list of the water systems in that area, if there is more than one to choose from you should click on the ones that seem most relevant. At this point, you might see a list of inspection types along with their dates. Click on the most recent inspection (unless there is a certain time period in which you have more interest) and read the report.

Interior Health

https://www.interiorhealth.ca/YourEnvironment/DrinkingWater/Pages/WaterSamples.aspx

You can enter your Facility, City, or select your Region from the drop-down menu, then you will see results for E. coli and Total Coliform tests.

Northern Health

http://www.healthspace.ca/Clients/NHA/NHA_Website.nsf

On the left hand side of the page click on Water Sample Results under the Drinking Water heading. Find and click on your community in the list on the left hand side of this site. This will take you to a list of the water systems in that area, if there is more than one to choose from you should click on the ones that seem most relevant. At this point, you might see a list of sampling sites; in which case, you should pick the ones that seem the most relevant. If you keep clicking you will come to a list of the water quality test results for that location, if they are available.

Vancouver Island Health Authority

http://www.healthspace.ca/Clients/VIHA/VIHA_Website.nsf

Click on Water Samples. Find and click on your community in the list on the left hand side of this site. This will take you to a list of the water systems in that area, if there is more than one to choose from you should click on the ones that seem most relevant. At this point, you might see a list of sampling sites and test results. You can see more test results by clicking on NEXT at the bottom of the page or changing how many results are shown per page.

Newfoundland and Labrador

http://maps.gov.nl.ca/water/

Scroll down to the heading “Community Water Resources Reports”, select your community from the drop-down list and click the “View Community Reports” button. This will bring you to a second drop-down list. The specific information dealing with the quality of your tap water can be found under “Tap Water Nutrients and Metals” and “Tap Water Physical Parameters and Major Ions”.

Northwest Territories

http://www.maca.gov.nt.ca/home/for-residents/land-water-waste/drinking-water/drinking-water-quality-database/

Select your community from the drop-down lists at the top of this page. Clicking either “Find Chemical Tests” or “Find Bacteriological Tests” will show a list of tests that have been done for these types of contaminants. You can click on “view results” in the right hand column to see the results of each of these tests.

Saskatchewan

www.saskh2o.ca/MyDrinkingWater.asp

On this page select the “View Water Sample Test Results” option, select your community from the drop-down list and click on “Go”.

On this page you can click on “Current Sampling Requirements” to see the results of the tests that have been done.

If you can't find your community's drinking water quality test results

If you can't find your community's drinking water quality test results then you can go to http://www.watertoday.ca/ and search for your community in the upper right hand search box. This will inform you of any boil water advisories in your community.

You can also perform an Internet search for your community's water quality test results, they might be available on your city's website.

You could phone your city's/town's water treatment plant or office and ask whether there are water quality test results available to the public and, if not, why they are not available to the public.



Virtual Water Information on the World Wide Web

ANDREW NIKIFORUK (AND THE UN) SAYS CANADA EXPORTS 272.5 X 109 M3 OF VIRTUAL WATER

He writes in a Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives paper, "Canada’s trade economy is deeply dependent on the quality and quantity of its water. Almost every Canadian product exported abroad (cattle, grain, hogs, automobiles, aluminum, electricity, wood or oil) contains enormous volumes of embedded water or what economists call ‘virtual water.’ Canada now exports more virtual water than either China or India in its trade goods. (About 15% of the water used in the world is exported in virtual form, largely because of cheap oil.) In addition, two out of every three litres of the nation’s freshwater withdrawals are used for the generation of electric power, an economic venture that is already threatened by climate change. Given the current volume of Canada’s virtual water exports (272.5 x 109 m3), exports of real water can only adversely affect the economy. University of Western Ontario engineer Slobodan Simonovic has calculated that “water export” from the St. Lawrence River Basin, for example, would reduce ‘the available water for consumption by different water use sectors.’ Exporting water simply means less water at home to create jobs and less water to sustain ecological services provided by rivers and lakes necessary for life.”
https://www.policyalternatives.ca/publications/monitor/november-2007-continental-water-follies

GLOBAL WATER PARTNERSHIP SUPPORTS THE VIRTUAL WATER TRADE

In the August issue of 'Scientific American' which focuses on 'facing the freshwater crisis', Peter Rogers, a senior adviser to the Global Water Partnership, writes "Keeping the demand for irrigation water in arid and semiarid areas down while still meeting the world’s future food requirements can be supported by supplying 'virtual water' to those places. The term relates to the amount of water expended in producing food or commercial goods. If such products are exported to a dry region, then that area will not have to use its own water to create them. Hence, the items represent a transfer of water to the recipient locale and supply them with so-called virtual water. The notion of virtual water may sound initially like a mere accounting device, but provision of goods—and the virtual-water content of those goods—is helping many dry countries avoid using their own water supplies for growing crops, thus freeing up large quantities for other applications. The virtual-water concept and expanded trade have also led to the resolution of many international disputes caused by water scarcity. Imports of virtual water in products by Jordan have reduced the chance of water-based conflict with its neighbor Israel, for example. The magnitude of annual global trade in virtual water exceeds 800 billion m3 of water a year; the equivalent of 10 Nile Rivers. Liberalizing trade of farm products and reducing tariff restrictions that now deter the flow of foodstuffs would significantly enhance global virtual-water flows. Truly free farm trade, for instance, would double the current annual total delivery of virtual water to more than 1.7 trillion m3."
http://www.sciam.com/article.cfm?id=facing-the-freshwater-crisis&page=4

NAFTA RESOURCE

The paper 'NAFTA and Virtual Water Trade: An estimation of virtual water trade in livestock and livestock products between Canada and the United States' by Nabeela Afrooz Rahman can be found at
http://uwspace.uwaterloo.ca/bitstream/10012/3736/1/Nabeela_Rahman_MESThesis_2008.pdf